By Doing Exactly What He Saw On TV He Turned This Hotplate Into A Fine DIY And Saved Money. Here’s How:

By Doing Exactly What He Saw On TV He Turned This Hotplate Into A Fine DIY And Saved Money. Here’s How:

 

The very characteristics of the clay flower pot that make it suitable for horticultural uses, make them also useful for other things they might not originally have been intended for. And of course it’s one that gives us a very scintillating meal at the end of it all, then why not. After all, it’s very simple to put together and has very little maintenance demands. All you need to do is gather a few other items and you’re good to go…

Here’s a list of the materials he used to make the low-cost clay pot smoker:

Materials:

  1. Clay flower pot
  2. Burner from a hotplate
  3. A grate for the grill
  4. A couple of  pavers

Tools: A screwdriver, wire cutter, and an electric drill.

Now let’s follow the basic parts and processes necessary to make it. First, the clay pot smoker is an electric one so he took out the ‘hotplate’ itself from the hotplate:

taking apart the hotplate from the hotplate - diy flower pot smoker
taking apart the hotplate from the hotplate – diy flower pot smoker (makezine)

 

  • Since this smoker uses an electric hotplate, it doesn’t need as much airflow as a charcoal smoker – but it still needs some. To elevate the smoker a bit, I bought several red concrete pavers (thinner than standard bricks) broke them in half, put three pieces down on the patio and set the flower pot on them. That gave me a few inches of clearance under the smoker.
burner fixed at the bottom - diy clay pot smoker
burner fixed at the bottom – diy clay pot smoker (makezine)

 

diy flower pot smoker
diy flower pot smoker (makezine)
  • Putting the chunks of hickory or applewood directly on the burner would be messy and hard to clean up. I needed a pan to hold the wood for smoking. The heat of the burner would make wood chunks smolder and give off plenty of smoke.
  • I bought two cheap cake pans at a dollar store and set one of them flat on the burner to hold chunks of hickory or other smoking wood. (Note the white ash left over from my first use.)
  • I stood two halved pavers on edge in the pan and rested another pan on top of them to catch drips. It was also used to hold water. The water provides humidity that helps the transfer of heat to the food.
  • The grill goes in last. It rests about five inches below the rim of the pot, giving plenty of clearance for the food being cooked.

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